2022 Schools' Competition Topics

Year 5

All debates are Prepared Debates. Speeches of 3 minutes; warning bell at 2 minutes.

Round 1: That cats are better than dogs.
Round 2: That CASA rules allowing pets in the cabin should be adopted by Australian airlines. (see link)
Round 3: That it is better to be an only child.
Round 4: That teachers should wear a school uniform.
Round 5: That Adelaide Zoo should sell Golden North ice-cream. (see link)

Year 6/7

All debates are Prepared Debates. Speeches of 3 minutes; warning bell at 2 minutes.

Round 1: That swooping magpies should be culled.
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 3 minutes; warning bell at 2 minutes.

Round 2: That the expansion of McDonalds into regional Australia should be stopped. (see link)
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 3 minutes; warning bell at 2 minutes.

Round 3: That Australian primary school students should cook and serve lunch. (see link)
Round 4: That schools should discourage best friends.
Round 5: That Adelaide Zoo should push for new Giant Pandas to replace Wang Wang and Fu Ni. (see link)

Year 8

All debates are Prepared Debates. Speeches of 4 minutes; warning bell at 3 minutes.

Round 1: That balloons and plastic confetti should be banned. (see link)
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 4 minutes; warning bell at 3 minutes.

Round 2: That we should change our preferential voting system to 'first past the post'.
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 4 minutes; warning bell at 3 minutes.

Round 3: That Margaret Court Arena should be renamed Ash Barty Arena.
Round 4: That Australia should become a Republic.
Round 5: That we should adopt Finland’s proportional fines for traffic infringements.

Year 9

Rounds 1 to 4 are Prepared Debates.
Speeches of 5 minutes; warning bell at 4 minutes.


Round 1: That the new grading policy is detrimental to students. (see link)
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 5 minutes; warning bell at 4 minutes.

Round 2: That the Wimbledon ban on tennis players from Russia and Belarus is unacceptable.
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 5 minutes; warning bell at 4 minutes.

Round 3: That de-extinction is a bad idea.
Round 4: That the use of facial recognition technology in a retail setting is going too far.
Round 5: That the Australian Government should act to free Julian Assange.

Year 10

Rounds 1 to 3 are Prepared Debates. Speeches of 6 minutes; warning bell at 5 minutes.

Round 1: That space is no place for civilians.
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 6 minutes; warning bell at 5 minutes.

Round 2: That having a university degree is overrated.
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 6 minutes; warning bell at 5 minutes.

Round 3: That legislation in Victoria to ban the display of the Nazi Swastika is a bad law.
Round 4: That nuclear energy in Australia should be an option.
Round 5: Short Preparation Debate
The Short Preparation Topic will be released 90 minutes before the scheduled debate. View guidelines here
Speeches of 5 minutes; warning bell at 4 minutes.

Senior


Round 1: That we should not bother to prosecute alleged war criminals for historic war crimes. (See link: The article is an example that can be debated and used as a springboard for further discussion.)
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 8 minutes; warning bell at 7 minutes.

Round 2: That Christos’ Installation art is pretentious (see link).
Question time format. See guidelines here. Speeches of 8 minutes; warning bell at 7 minutes.

Round 3: That Australia should not sign the International Treaty on Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness and Response.
Prepared Debate Speeches of 8 minutes; warning bell at 7 minutes.

Round 4: Short Preparation Debate
The Short Preparation Topic will be released 90 minutes before the scheduled debate. View guidelines here
Speeches of 6 minutes; warning bell at 5 minutes.

Special Formats of Prepared Debates

Quodlibetical Topic

There are a number of issues that can’t be easily expressed in a one-line topic. Therefore you have been given a fictitious scenario, outlined by a few paragraphs, and a topic that is based on this scenario. The following should be noted:

1. The first speaker should not attempt to define the topic word for word, but rather should define the issue(s) or dilemma(s) that the topic presents.

2. It is this issue or dilemma that should be debated in an attempt to prove whichever side of the topic, i.e. feel free to debate the particular issue generally, but be sure to link it back to the topic as this is what you want to argue for or against.

3. There is no need for the first speaker to read out the initial paragraphs as the Chairman will do this before announcing the topic, however, any speaker may refer to these paragraphs as part of his/her argument.

4. Debaters are welcome and are encouraged to conduct further research on the issues presented but note that the scenario itself is often fictitious.

View the 2021 topics here.